Friday, September 17, 2010

Any more panels, and I'll be able to furnish a rec room

I'm moderating two panels at Bouchercon 2010 in San Francisco, Oct. 14-17. "The Stamp of Death" happens Thursday, Oct. 14, at 3 p.m. (The panel's title is a tribute to the host city's crime-drama tradition.)

Panelists are Michael Sears and Stanley Trollip, who write together as Michael Stanley; Yrsa Sigurðardóttir; and Christopher G. Moore, with yours truly lending an unobtrusive guiding hand.

"Flags of Terror" (whose title has a similar origin) on Friday, Oct. 15, at 10 a.m., brings together James R. Benn, Cara Black, Lisa Brackmann, Henry Chang, Jassy Mackenzie and Stuart Neville for an hour or so of civilized discussion, with your humble blogkeeper again asking the questions and frisking the participants for weapons.

The authors on these panels take readers to Iceland, Botswana, China, South Africa, Thailand, Northern Ireland, England, France, and what may be the setting richest with possibility, New York's Chinatown. And you're invited along for the ride, whether at the convention or by reading, reading and reading.

I'll see you at Bouchercon. And remember: If you're baking in San Francisco, be sure to wear some flour in your hair.

© Peter Rozovsky 2010

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22 Comments:

Blogger Dana King said...

I'm sorry I can't attend this year. Your panel on translations last year was a highlight for me. I went because we're friends, but leaned more there than maybe anywhere else that week.

Good luck, have fun, and I hope to see you in St. Louis next year, if not before.

September 17, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Thanks for the kind words. I'll save a seat you in San Francisco just in case you show up at the last minute.

September 17, 2010  
Blogger Barbara said...

Hope to make these this time!

September 17, 2010  
Blogger Judy Bobalik said...

Did you know where the titles came from before you googled?

September 17, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Barbara, I take it that you are not letting silly things like teaching responsibilities interfere this year. Or is it just that I'm a little later on the schedule than I was in Indianapolis?

September 17, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Judy:

I remember The Streets of San Francisco certainly, but not titles of episodes. I found out the connection only when I did searches for the titles.

September 17, 2010  
Blogger Judy Bobalik said...

Jon and I have a bet that Lee Goldberg will know where the titles came from without doing a google search. He may be the only person besides the writers of said episodes that would.

September 17, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Well, that will give Lee something to crow about, then.

I did get a kick out of the titles once I found out their origin. Now, my only question is whether there were enough episodes to name all the panels.

September 17, 2010  
Blogger Judy Bobalik said...

There were 120 episodes. We have 74panels. So yes.

September 17, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

My nostalgia for car chases, for hot-tempered Michael Douglas and for calm, wise but deadly tough Karl Malrden is rekindled already.

September 17, 2010  
Blogger Barbara said...

Still have the pesky teaching commitments, but I'm leaving at 5am for the airport and arriving by 9am-ish thanks to gaining time by flying west.

So I will there, but if I fall asleep, somebody hit me with a program.

September 18, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

My Thursday panel is at 3 p.m., which may or may not give you enough time to gain a second wind.

I'll be be unable to hit you with a program from the stage, and I don't trust my aim enough to throw anything at you. If you snore too loudly, I will just lean into my microphone, raise my voice slightly, and ask if the lady from the frozen north wishes to rouse herself from early hibernation and ask any questions of the panelists.

September 18, 2010  
Anonymous kathy d. said...

These panels sound fascinating.

Hope that they are fully reported on for those unable to attend, but who want to hear about everything--or whatever is possible.

September 19, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Kathy, I had great fun reporting on Bouchercon 2008 and 2009. I have no reason to expect 2010 to be different.

I discovered last year that reporting on a panel in which one has taken part is no easy thing; I can't take notes when I'm part of the action. But I'll try.

September 19, 2010  
Anonymous solo said...

Did I say I was going to keep my trap shut? Well, that starts tomorrow.

I've always been slightly fascinated by San Francisco. That Bouchercon panel you're moderating sounds interesting. I may be wrong but I think most people will think of movies when they think of SF's 'crime-drama tradition.'

Sure, there's Hammett but how many other writers would one instantly associate with SF?

I don't wish to be presumptuous (heck, what am I saying, I like being presumptuous) but it strikes me that while your literary knowledge is impeccable, your knowledge of movies lags somewhat behind. You did admit to watching that great SF movie Bullitt for the first time just this year so I don't believe my comment is doing you a great disservice.

Anyway, I've been trawling YouTube for SF crime movie links. In all likelihood they won't have anything you don't already know and they're probably best ignored.

But anyway:

here's a clip that lists many of the locations used in Vertigo.

The opening of Dark Passage, based on the David Goodis novel, features San Quentin and the rest of the movie prominently features the Filbert Steps and Montgomery Street where the Lauren Bacall character has her apartment

The 1951 movie The Man Who Cheated Himself with Lee J Cobb and Ronald Reagan's first wife Jane Wyatt has its climax at Fort Point, a location used in Vertigo and also in Point Blank, the John Boorman version of Richard Stark's The Hunter.

Coppola's The Conversation begins with a scene set in Union Square, not far from the famous John's Grill on Ellis Street

Of course, there's all those Dirty Harry movies and The Lineup which I believe you watched recently and probably a thousand others that I haven't thought of that make great use of Frisco but I've bored you enough already.

September 19, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Since Blogger is destroying comments again:

solo has left a new comment on your post "Any more panels, and I'll be able to furnish a rec...":

Did I say I was going to keep my trap shut? Well, that starts tomorrow.

I've always been slightly fascinated by San Francisco. That Bouchercon panel you're moderating sounds interesting. I may be wrong but I think most people will think of movies when they think of SF's 'crime-drama tradition.'

Sure, there's Hammett but how many other writers would one instantly associate with SF?

I don't wish to be presumptuous (heck, what am I saying, I like being presumptuous) but it strikes me that while your literary knowledge is impeccable, your knowledge of movies lags somewhat behind. You did admit to watching that great SF movie Bullitt for the first time just this year so I don't believe my comment is doing you a great disservice.

Anyway, I've been trawling YouTube for SF crime movie links. In all likelihood they won't have anything you don't already know and they're probably best ignored.

But anyway:

here's a clip that lists many of the locations used in Vertigo.

The opening of Dark Passage, based on the David Goodis novel, features San Quentin and the rest of the movie prominently features the Filbert Steps and Montgomery Street where the Lauren Bacall character has her apartment

The 1951 movie The Man Who Cheated Himself with Lee J Cobb and Ronald Reagan's first wife Jane Wyatt has its climax at Fort Point, a location used in Vertigo and also in Point Blank, the John Boorman version of Richard Stark's The Hunter.

Coppola's The Conversation begins with a scene set in Union Square, not far from the famous John's Grill on Ellis Street

Of course, there's all those Dirty Harry movies and The Lineup which I believe you watched recently and probably a thousand others that I haven't thought of that make great use of Frisco but I've bored you enough already.

September 19, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I'm no expert on movies, nor do I have great expectation that you'll keep your trap shut. I would not recognize you if you did.

And I am eager to learn about San Francisco and movies. A Bouchercon blog is taking suggestions for San Francisco-related titles to be screened at the convention's movie night. Thanks for the clips. I suspect they will be of interest to more than one Bouchercon attendee.
I'm no expert on movies, nor do I have great expectation that you'll keep your trap shut. I would not recognize you if you did.

And I am eager to learn about San Francisco and movies. A Bouchercon blog is taking suggestions for San Francisco-related titles to be screened at the convention's movie night. Thanks for the clips. I suspect they will be of interest to more than one Bouchercon attendee.

September 19, 2010  
Blogger Linkmeister said...

Meg Gardiner has written three books so far about a forensic psychiatrist based in San Francisco (the top three on that page). Her others are based further south around China Lake.

September 20, 2010  
Blogger Linkmeister said...

Wikipedia lists 154 films set in SFO.

September 20, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Linkmeister, I don't know if the panels and other presentations and discussions will include sessions devoted to San Francisco crime fiction. Such a discussion might be entertaining and educational.

There will be a Nero Wolfe dinner as an optional side event.

September 20, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Solo, you’ll find more San Francisco crime books, movies and television shows here.

September 21, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Ronald Reagan's first wife Jane Wyatt

Isn't that Jane Wyman?

September 24, 2010  

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